Jeremy Leach - Traded Life Policies Specialist - Traded Life Policies Expert - Life Settlements Specialist
 
Biography

Jeremy Leach commenced his career in composite insurance broking in 1984 where he developed an extensive level of experience in all facets of personal lines, commercial insurance and discretionary asset management.

When polarisation of the Insurance and Financial Services industry occurred in the United Kingdom in the late 1980’s, he gravitated towards the Financial Services sector, furthering his knowledge and experience in respect of investment management and collective investment schemes.

He holds a number of non-executive board positions with Regulated Mutual Funds and Securitisations and also sits on the board of a number of financial services companies. He is the CEO of the Managing Partners Group (“MPG”), a Global Fund Management group that manages a number of Regulated Mutual Funds and Collective Investment Schemes.

He is a member of the Worshipful Company of International Bankers (Incorporated by Royal Charter).

Jeremy Leach is widely regarded as one of the most knowledgeable asset managers in the field of traded life policies and life settlements. He has written in excess of 100 technical articles on life settlements, financials and economic trends for retail media groups including the Financial Times Group as well as being a guest speaker on CNBC.

Latest News
 
Inflation takes centre stage as 2017 opens

Central bank policies in advanced markets have traditionally set an appropriate level of inflation for a growing economy at 2% a year. Few markets however have anywhere near that level of cost rises; but 2017 will be a year in which inflation takes centre stage.

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Inflation set for significant comeback in 2017, MPG says

Economic recovery and interest rate and commodity price rises will spur wage-push inflation in US, UK and Eurozone, asset manager Managing Partners Group (MPG) says

Economic recovery and rises in interest rates and commodity prices will generate greater borrowing and utility costs and spur wage-push inflation of up to 5% in the US and the UK, and between 2.5% to 3.0% in the Eurozone, MPG says.

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